Treatment Aftercare–The Value of Extended Family

Posted by New Haven Residential Treatment Center | Tips for Families, Treatment 101 | aftercare family parenting treatment 0 Comments

Regardless of whether you tap your own family members or engage the support of neighbors and friends, a consistent community of trusted adults can be a critical part of your child’s healing after treatment. Here are some tips for building up a strong support system of family members and/or friends and neighbors.

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Different Types of Treatment Professionals

The great advantage to residential treatment is that you get an enormous amount of professional expertise concentrated in one place. While a robust team of diverse specialties is great for your child’s treatment, it can be confusing to know who does what. The following list will at least give you a sense of who’s who on the treatment team.

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Parenting through Sexual Trauma

Posted by New Haven Residential Treatment Center | Sexual Promiscuity, Tips for Families, Trauma & PTSD | abuse disclosure parenting promiscuity sexual activity 0 Comments

The key contribution parents can make when their child is in treatment is to provide understanding and support, even as they work through their own painful emotions. This is a challenge, of course, and means that parents must engage their own therapeutic work in order to be able to help their daughter.

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PTSD and Brain Research for Teen Trauma Victims

With adolescent trauma victims and their families, therapist Brad Rentfro, LPC, is using new brain research to great effect. Since neural pathways can actually be re-routed, says Rentfro, PTSD patients can literally change how their brains process both old and new situations.

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Parenting a Trauma Victim

Posted by New Haven Residential Treatment Center | Tips for Families, Trauma & PTSD | parenting post traumatic stress disorder PTSD trauma 0 Comments

When an adolescent experiences symptoms of post-traumatic stress, it’s not unusual for her parents to feel confused and suspicious. That’s because it’s incredibly painful for a parent to know that their child has been so deeply wounded. In fact, it can be so difficult to process a child’s trauma that the parent may unwittingly minimize and deny—it’s just too much to take in.

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