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Create a Lasting Connection with your children

Create A Lasting Connection With Your Children

While writing this article my mind is replaying the words, “Tradition! Tradition!” from Fiddler on the Roof. In the musical, Tevye is referring to the typical roles of fathers, mothers, and children at that time and in that culture. Family roles represent just one of many areas impacted by traditions and rituals. In my own…

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A student at New Haven painting during art class

What Are the Symptoms of ADHD?

What Are the Symptoms of ADHD? By, Laurie Laird  Reference: mentalhealth.about.com/cs/familyresources/l/bladd.htm ADHD is not like a broken arm, or strep throat, it does not have clear physical signs that can be seen in an x-ray or a lab test. ADHD can only be identified by looking for certain characteristic behaviors and these behaviors vary from person…

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Personal Growth Plan: Eating an Elephant

Neuropsychologists believe that an incremental approach to change tricks our brains into accepting giant, ambitious goals. When faced with the enormity of certain tasks, our primitive brain wants to fight or flee.

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Improving Family Relationships

Many of the families I’ve worked with feel that they have lost everything. They are financially tapped out. Their basic assumptions about family, love, success, and life have been turned upside down. They feel betrayed and embarrassed and sad and angry. How does a family rebuild in the wake of trauma, or addiction, or mental illness, or betrayal, or loss? A little bit every day. If you can do that, you can find your way forward a step at a time. You can heal. You can hope.

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Humor in Therapy

Humor during individual and group therapy—whether from the therapist or the client—can lighten a mood, break a pattern, improve sharing, create a sense of perspective, generate a feeling of well-bring and hope, and provide an effective delivery system for difficult feedback. Family systems therapists will sometimes encourage family members to consciously employ a form of humor to interrupt entrenched relational patterns.

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Parent to Parent: Placing your Teen in Treatment

If you’re like us, you are used to at least maintaining the illusion of control in most parts of your life. Also if you’re like us, your teenager has done a lot to destroy that illusion! It’s easy to make up for those feelings of powerlessness by trying to micromanage her treatment process and the treatment team from a distance. We did that for about the first three months. It doesn’t help and it will exhaust you. Once we finally let go and got out of the way, the healing process really began—about three months behind schedule!

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A Daughter and her parents smiling

Healing The Family System

Since the family is a dynamic system comprised of deeply interdependent members, the more members who participate in treatment the better. In most cases this is true regardless of their past role in the family. But there are exceptions.

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Nurture Your Relationship

Do you have a story of how a key relationship made a critical difference in you or your family’s journey toward healing? A relative? A friend? A therapist? Even a stranger? If so, we would love to hear about it.

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PTSD and Brain Research for Teen Trauma Victims

With adolescent trauma victims and their families, therapist Brad Rentfro, LPC, is using new brain research to great effect. Since neural pathways can actually be re-routed, says Rentfro, PTSD patients can literally change how their brains process both old and new situations.

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Family Volunteering

While volunteering to help others may not seem like a sophisticated mental-health technique, those who engage in community service tend to weigh less, have fewer health problems, and report a higher measure of subjective happiness than those who don’t.

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Families That Eat Together Stay Together

Rather than suddenly corralling the family for seven nights of regimented dining, though, ease into it if it’s not already a habit. One or two nights a week is a great start. Make it fun by cooking something everyone will like (or even ordering in) and try to make dinner time fit everyone’s schedule to the extent you can. This approach is more likely to leave your family wanting more, rather than less, of this healthy family habit.

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